4Ocean Spends the Weekend at Community Cleanups in St. Pete, Florida - 4ocean

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4Ocean Spends the Weekend at Community Cleanups in St. Pete, Florida

by 4Ocean Team August 30, 2018 1 Comment

4Ocean Spends the Weekend at Community Cleanups in St. Pete, Florida

The 4Ocean Cleanup Team traveled to the west coast of Florida this past weekend for an eventful 3 days filled with beach cleanups and education. 

 

The weekend kicked off on Friday evening, August 24, with the 4Ocean team's presentation at the TradeWinds. We shared more about our company, our mission, and our cleanups. We also talked about the small changes we can make in our daily lives that will help stop plastic and trash from entering the ocean in the first place. Simple things like eliminating single-use plastics (straws, utensils, water bottles, etc.) can help to make a positive impact on our ocean and coastlines.

 

 

We couldn't have asked for more a more beautiful day to host our first cleanup of the weekend! That Saturday morning, we focused our cleanup efforts on Fort DeSoto, the largest park in Pinellas County. It's made up of five interconnected islands that span a total of 1,163 acres. We went to work on the stretch of beach north of the Gulf Pier. We're so thankful for the 220 amazing volunteers who came out to make this cleanup possible! 

 

 

The TradeWinds Eco-Team joined our Sunday morning cleanup at St. Pete Beach, the weekend's grand finale. Set up near the Guy Harvey Outpost on the Tradewinds property, we had so many volunteers show up that we beat our previous record of the most volunteers at a 4Ocean community cleanup. We had 348 awesome and dedicated participants show up to volunteer their time and help make the biggest impact possible on the beaches of St. Pete. 

 

 

In total, we removed 727 pounds of trash from Fort DeSoto and St. Pete Beach! Out of the 527 pounds of trash collected from St. Pete Beach, a whopping six pounds was just cigarette butts! With 2.3 million cigarette butts littered every minute across the globe, it's no wonder that they're the most common item found during beach cleanups across the globe.

See how many cigarette butts our curious video team found in a tiny 4' x 6' section of beach. That's just about the area two beach towels would take up if you laid them side by side. And their findings may surprise you!

 

 

None of our efforts this weekend would have been possible without support from Pinellas County, who kept us up to date on the status of the weather and red tide leading up to the morning of our event; the park rangers at Fort DeSoto, who were all extremely helpful with our cleanup there; and the TradeWinds Eco Team. The Eco Team's mission, like ours, is to help make our oceans and coastlines cleaner.

 

With the world making incredible strides in technology and advanced conveniences, we are leaving a large footprint on the earth and its majestic waters. Our oceans and their ecosystems have drastically decreased in their overall health and well-being. Our goal is to lessen the TradeWinds footprint on our waters.
- TW Eco Team

 

Check out some more photos from our weekend cleanup and head over to our events calendar to find a 4Ocean community cleanup near you!

 

 

 

 

 

 



4Ocean Team
4Ocean Team

Author

1 Response

lorene i melvin
lorene i melvin

October 02, 2018

I just completed a coastal cleanup on Plum Island MA. Being a state with sky high cigarette prices, I only found two butts in a one mile stretch of beach. It is an infrequent event to see someone smoking in MA now that a pack costs over $10. Turns out it is also good for the ocean.

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