#4Sharks: 4Ocean Partners with Project AWARE

#4Sharks: 4Ocean Partners with Project AWARE

by 4Ocean Team July 12, 2018

#4Sharks: 4Ocean Partners with Project AWARE

#4Sharks: 4Ocean Partners with Project AWARE


4Ocean is partnering with Project AWARE® throughout the month of July to support shark conservation and save a vitally important marine species.


Did you know that sharks are considered keystone species in the ocean environment? A keystone species is one that plays a vital role in the way an ecosystem function.


When a keystone species is removed from its habitat, it can have serious negative consequences for the ecosystem it supports — even to the point where that ecosystem ceases to exist.


A shark-infested reef is a healthy reef! Yet many shark species are being pushed to the brink of extinction by things like:


  • Overfishing
  • Finning
  • Culling
  • Entanglement in marine debris and discarded fishing gear
  • The bioaccumulation of toxins from plastic pollution

What Project AWARE is doing to save sharks


Project AWARE connects their passion for ocean adventure with the purpose of marine conservation by working with the dive community to clean the ocean and protect sharks.


They support shark conservation through programs like Dive Against Debris® and #DiversForMakos.


Dive Against Debris®


This campaign makes Project AWARE a natural partner for 4Ocean because it unites adventure with a purpose, encouraging divers to collect trash during their dives.


They’ve already pulled one million pieces of trash from beneath the waves and provided invaluable information about underwater debris to help inform policy change.


#Divers4Makos

Project AWARE started this petition in an effort to protect the Atlantic Shortfin Mako species of shark, which has no protections and is being uniquely threatened by overfishing.


The goal is to pressure top mako-fishing countries to adopt the ICCAT (International Commision for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas) recommendations to cut the catch limit for Shortfin Makos to zero to rebuild their stocks by 2040.


Top mako-fishing countries include:


  • Spain
  • Portugal
  • Morocco
  • Canada
  • Japan
  • Taiwan
  • Indonesia
  • USA

Even with a zero-catch limit, the Shortfin Mako only has a 54 percent chance of recovering by 2040.


Throughout the month of July, we’re offering the black Limited Edition Shark Bracelet. In addition to pulling a pound of trash from the ocean and coastlines, the sale of each bracelet also supports Project AWARE and their shark conservation efforts.



4Ocean Team
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