The Canopy Project

by 4Ocean Team April 13, 2018 1 Comment

The Canopy Project

Global climate change is one of the biggest threats to life as we know it on this planet. The man-made release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases such as methane and perfluorocarbons (PFC’s), are causing our planet to warm at an unnatural rate. This warming is threatening many different marine ecosystems around the world and is creating stress and mortality for the marine life that lives there. It is this fact that has driven us to partner with Earth Day Network for the month of April to help support The Canopy Project . 

Earth Day Network’s ‘The Canopy Project’ has one major goal: to plant 7.8 billion trees by 2020; that’s one for every person on the planet! With decades of working in communities around the world, Earth Day Network is planting trees that benefit not only the communities but the environment. Their efforts have benefited millions of people across six continents with The Canopy Project.

4Ocean’s efforts of helping plant trees through The Canopy Project are focused in the northern city of Lira, Uganda. So far, the project has planted 230,000 trees consisting of nine different species of tree, three of which bear fruit. Earth Day Network’s team is not only aiding the reforestation of Lira but are training and mentoring farmers participating in the Lira Forest Garden Project. These farmers also received resources to aid in stabilizing and revitalizing their soils and enhancing groundwater recharge, which is water that has soaked into the ground, and moved through pores and fractures in soil and rock to the depth at which soil and rocks are fully saturated with water.

Through the Lira Forest Garden Project, water resources have been positively impacted and the trees planted helps to increase the water filtration capacity of soils in the fields where the trees are planted. This will likely increase water availability for the communities that rely on wells and springs for portable water!

We at 4Ocean proudly support the efforts of The Canopy Project and have happily partnered with Earth Day Network for the month of April. All month long, for each bracelet sold, we will remove one pound of trash from the ocean and coastlines and support the planting of trees through The Canopy Project.

Get your Limited Edition Earth Day Bracelet HERE.

 



4Ocean Team
4Ocean Team

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1 Response

CHESNOY Genevieve
CHESNOY Genevieve

June 29, 2018

Je n’ai qu’un mot à dire : BRAVO !!! C’est en jouant sur Messenger que j’ai découvert votre formidable organisation. Je suis de près toutes ces initiatives même les plus humbles. J’attends avec impatience mon bracelet qui m’aidera à faire valoir votre action autour de moi.

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