We’ve released the Jellyfish Bracelet in partnership with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution



We’ve released the Jellyfish Bracelet in partnership with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Our Jellyfish Bracelet highlights the vital role jellyfish play in maintaining a healthy ocean. However, we need more research and greater insight into exactly what that role is and how it fits into the changes taking place throughout the ocean every day. Our $25,000 donation to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution will support a unique research program to deepen our knowledge of jellyfish, their role in the marine food web, and how the mysterious twilight zone is connected to other parts of the ocean.

Jellyfish were around long before the first dinosaurs and play an important role in the health of our oceans.

Orange nettle jellyfish

Jellyfish and other jelly-like animals predate the dinosaurs, are found all over the world, and help shape the very backbone of our ocean’s food web. The scientists doing this twilight zone research are interested in all types of flexible floaters — gelatinous animals that are nearly transparent and made mostly of water, yet have very different structures — like salps, comb jellies, pteropods, and jellyfish.

Jellyfish may not have a great reputation with beach-goers, but in the ocean, they are graceful swimmers that serve many functions. Predators like turtles and ocean sunfish rely on jellies as a food source, while jellies themselves feast on fast-growing sea life like plankton, as well as small fish and crustaceans.

Some of these delicate animals can even migrate surprising distances, traveling as much as 600 meters (2,000 feet) up and down every day as they seek food and avoid predators. This tremendous migration helps move carbon and nutrients from the ocean’s surface to deeper waters, making them a valuable player in regulating Earth’s climate system.

Orange nettle jellyfish

Floating plastic is frequently mistaken for jellyfish by predators

Jellies are an important source of food for animals like ocean sunfish and leatherback turtles. Some marine mammals and birds will also consume jellies when other prey is scarce. This potentially makes jellyfish an essential food source for marine animals that are migrating into new regions as ocean temperatures rise. The plastic waste that infiltrates the ocean is often consumed by predators in pursuit of a jellyfish meal. This simple mistake can have dire consequences.

Jellyfish are also eating plastic

Some jelly animals are also consuming plastic, often in the form of miniscule particles known as microplastics. This may affect the health of these animals and also presents another way for the chemicals inside plastic to enter the food chain. There is still much to learn about all the ways plastic may be affecting the world around us, especially the ocean, and yet so many ways we can prevent plastic from entering the ocean and removing that which has.

Overfishing is overinflating jellyfish populations

Many commercial fish species are being overfished, which creates gaps in the ocean’s natural ecosystem. Consequently, scientists have seen jellyfish numbers climb in recent years, replacing the fish that are missing. This shift in the food web drains food and resources for other species, further disrupting the ocean’s natural balance.

We’re still figuring out the relationship between jellyfish and climate change

When we burn fossil fuels for energy, carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere, where it traps heat, warming our ocean and land. The increasing numbers of jellyfish may be because the warmer water is more favorable for jellyfish than it is for other marine species. Scientists continue research to unravel the relationship between jellyfish and climate change so that we may anticipate future changes and responsibly manage our effects on marine ecosystems.

We’re donating $25,000 to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to advance ocean sustainability

Founded in 1930, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is one of the most highly respected and innovative ocean research organizations in the world. Their seagoing research has uncovered some of the most incredible discoveries of all time, and their innovations in marine research will help us better track and treat the impacts of a changing ocean.

WHOI has been studying jellyfish for over 50 years. And with the introduction of Mesobot — a stealthy, autonomous, underwater robot able to navigate within the twilight zone — researchers at WHOI will soon be better able to document jellies and other residents of the dark living spaces deep beneath the ocean’s surface. This technology helps researchers learn more about the role of jellyfish in the ecosystem and how they are adapting to changing marine conditions.

You have the power to make a difference.

By purchasing a Jellyfish Bracelet, you’ll remove one pound of trash from the ocean and coastlines while raising awareness about the importance of jellyfish research. Wear it as a reminder to curb your plastic habit, live more sustainably, and encourage others to take action to protect what they love.

Jellyfish form a critical link in the ocean’s food chain. Now you can become a critical link in the chain that links a healthy ocean to a healthy planet and a healthy future. If you’d like to do more to support marine research, we encourage you to get involved with or contribute directly to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with a gift.

Pacific sea nettle jellyfish

Predators like sea turtles often mistake
single-use plastics for jellyfish prey

In partnership with

Some jellyfish migrate as much as 600 meters (2,000 feet) vertically every day, bringing carbon and nutrients to the ocean’s deepest waters.

Large predators like giant sunfish, tuna, and leatherback sea turtles use jellyfish as an important food source.

Jellyfish have been around for over 600 million years, making them one of the oldest kinds of living marine animals.

Some jellyfish migrate as much as 600 meters (2,000 feet) vertically every day, bringing carbon and nutrients to the ocean’s deepest waters.

Large predators like giant sunfish, tuna, and leatherback sea turtles use jellyfish as an important food source.

Jellyfish have been around for over 600 million years, making them one of the oldest kinds of living marine animals.

Jellyfish Bracelet

Pull a pound for jellyfish

When you purchase this bracelet, we’ll pull a pound of trash from the ocean and coastlines on your behalf.

FEATURES

  • Cord made from 100% post-consumer recycled plastic bottles, including less than 5% reclaimed ocean plastic
  • Clear glass beads made from 100% post-consumer recycled glass bottles, including less than 5% reclaimed ocean glass
  • Stainless steel 4ocean charm
  • Hand assembled in Bali
  • Unisex, waterproof design
  • Adjustable from 2” to 5” in diameter
  • Packaged in a reusable cotton drawstring pouch
  • Includes “1LB” vinyl decal
  • Includes 4ocean logo vinyl decal (5 ⅜” x ⅞”)

Jellyfish Bracelet

Pull a pound for jellyfish

When you purchase this bracelet, we’ll pull a pound of trash from the ocean and coastlines on your behalf.

FEATURES