We’ve partnered with Global Penguin Society to bring you our new Penguin Bracelet



We’ve partnered with
Global Penguin Society
to bring you our new
Penguin Bracelet

The Penguin Bracelet raises awareness about the importance of penguins in the world’s oceans. It shines a spotlight on our nonprofit partner Global Penguin Society and the work they’re doing to study and conserve the world’s penguins.

Our $25,000 donation to Global Penguin Society supports penguin conservation by advancing scientific research, education, habitat protections, and species management so these beloved animals will be around for generations to come.

One of the main problems for penguins is that they’re not only marine animals, they’re also animals that live on land, so they accumulate threats not only in the ocean, but also on land.

- Pablo García Borboroglu
Founder and President
Global Penguin Society

Adult penguin and chick nesting, Antarctica

Penguins are a crucial and irreplaceable part of the ocean ecosystem. They spend up to 80% of their time in the sea and the rest on land, which means they’re uniquely adapted to two different environments and vulnerable to the threats found in each.

Because of their broad geographic range and the effort they expend to find food, penguins are exposed to a variety of environmental threats. As such, penguins are considered a sentinel species, or “early warning system,” for the health of the entire ocean. Changes in their populations can indicate trouble for other species, including humans, who depend on the waters they inhabit for survival.

Many penguin populations are declining worldwide due to threats like plastic pollution, climate change, and overfishing. More than half of all penguin species are listed as threatened on the IUCN Red List, which makes them one of the most endangered seabirds in the world.

But there is hope. By advancing scientific research of penguins and their habitats, we can improve conservation efforts and develop better species management practices that protect penguins and allow their populations to recover.

Adult penguin and chick nesting, Antarctica

Plastic ingestion and the bioaccumulation of toxins

Researchers estimate that by 2050, nearly every species of seabird will be ingesting plastic debris — and that includes penguins. Plastic isn’t digestible; it accumulates in penguins’ bellies and prevents them from digesting real food. Sharp plastic fragments can cause fatal internal injuries while soft plastics can block their digestive tract.

Plastic absorbs toxins from the environment and emits chemicals as it degrades. Penguins that ingest ocean plastic are also at risk for the bioaccumulation of toxins, which can cause a variety of health issues, including neurological and reproductive disorders as well as cancer and birth defects.

Entanglement and habitat degradation

Plastic invades even the most remote penguin habitats, washing up on nesting beaches and fouling colonies throughout the Southern Hemisphere. Lost and discarded fishing gear is responsible for entangling most seabird species, but it’s not uncommon to see penguins entangled in other man-made pollution like 6-pack rings.

Climate change

Climate change is one of the biggest threats to penguins. Warming in the polar regions has caused a considerable increase in melted sea ice, which penguins depend on to forage and nest. Climate change also affects temperate penguin species; an increase in the severity and frequency of storms have killed many chicks in some colonies. An increase in heat waves is also affecting penguin survival outside of Antarctica.

Overfishing

Overfishing forces penguins to compete for food with fishermen. With less of their normal prey, some penguin species change their diet which leads to malnutrition. With less food immediately available, adult penguins must travel farther and stay away from their chicks longer, which can mean malnutrition or death for the chicks.

Recovery is possible

Establishing conservation areas and marine protected areas in and around crucial nesting habitats is one of the most effective ways to stop declining penguin populations. Global Penguin Society has already helped protect 32 million acres of penguin habitat, benefitting more than 1.6 million penguins globally. The more awareness we can raise about what’s happening to penguins and their habitats, the more we can do to push for better conservation measures that allow penguins to recover their populations.

We’re donating $25,000 to Global Penguin Society to advance penguin conservation

As the first and only international organization dedicated exclusively to the conservation of the world’s penguin species, Global Penguin Society is the leading authority on penguin science, education, and advocacy.

Through their research, Global Penguin Society shares sound scientific data that is used to conserve penguins and marine environments locally, regionally, and globally.

The society fosters a “conservation culture” in all of their educational activities. Their goal is to involve and empower local communities and decision makers in the protection of penguins and their habitats.

Once the society identifies priority areas for penguin conservation, they work with governments, community officials, and landowners to establish and implement effective conservation policies that not only benefit penguins, but their entire local ecosystems and nearby communities.

You have the power to make a difference.

By purchasing a Penguin Bracelet, you’ll remove one pound of trash from the ocean and coastlines while raising awareness about declining penguin populations and the actions we can take to save them. If you’d like to do even more to support penguin conservation, we encourage you to get involved with or donate to Global Penguin Society directly.

African penguin, Stony Point Nature Reserve, South Africa

Penguin entangled in discarded fishing net and plastic 6-pack ring

In partnership with

Most penguin species swim at an average speed of 4-7 miles per hour, but the Gentoo can reach 22 miles per hour underwater.

Penguins are able to drink sea water thanks to an organ called the supraorbital gland, which filters salt from their bloodstream.

Penguins’ black and white coloration is a protective measure called countershading that makes it hard for predators to detect them in the water.

Most penguin species swim at an average speed of 4-7 miles per hour, but the Gentoo can reach 22 miles per hour underwater.

Penguins are able to drink sea water thanks to an organ called the supraorbital gland, which filters salt from their bloodstream.

Penguins’ black and white coloration is a protective measure called countershading that makes it hard for predators to detect them in the water.

Penguin Bracelet

Pull a pound for penguins

When you purchase this bracelet, we’ll pull a pound of trash from the ocean and coastlines on your behalf.

FEATURES

  • Cord made from 100% post-consumer recycled plastic bottles, including less than 5% reclaimed ocean plastic

  • Clear glass beads made from 100% post-consumer recycled glass bottles, including less than 5% reclaimed ocean glass

  • Stainless steel 4ocean charm

  • Hand assembled in Bali

  • Unisex, waterproof design

  • Adjustable from 2” to 5” in diameter

  • Packaged in a reusable cotton drawstring pouch

  • Includes “1LB” vinyl decal

  • Includes 4ocean logo vinyl decal (5 ⅜” x ⅞”)

Penguin Bracelet

Pull a pound for penguins

When you purchase this bracelet, we’ll pull a pound of trash from the ocean and coastlines on your behalf.

FEATURES